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The Nature Of Animal Healing
Martin Goldstein, DVM

Dr. Goldstein is an expert on treating animals with cancer and leukemia. In this book, he explain how you can keep your pets healthy and heal them, naturally.

He goes into the detail about food, vaccination, different types of treatments, healing crisis. Each ailments are
listed from A to Z, including cause for cancer, treatment
and possible cures.

He also recommends Biovet products including: Dismutase, AOX/PLX, Feline Support, Canine Support, and Dietary
Pest Control to assure your pet's long healthy, comfortable, beautiful life.

Available at all major bookstores an Amazon.com.

 

DOCTOR'S DIALOGUE

Reprinted with the permission of LET'S LIVE Magazine
September 1988

Is SOD The Solution To Arthritis, Heart Disease And Aging?

By David A. Steenblock, M.S. , N.M.D., D.O.

Sometimes we need a natural, safe and effective treatment if we are sick. SOD (superoxide dismutase) is a natural, safe enzyme that has helped treat a variety of health problems. Arthritis and other auto immune conditions such as lupus, respond well to this agent. These inflammatory diseases are due in great degree to the reaction of white blood cells on tissues. White blood cells generate harmful free radicals such as superoxide anion (an oxygen molecule that has acquired an extra electron). Free radicals are like sparks and smoke from a bonfire that isn't getting enough air. Sod "soaks up" these sparks and smoke, turning them into harmless substances.
SOD has been shown to be a unique, anti-inflammatory drug by virtue of a combination of the following characteristics: It is effective; it can be taken with other anti-inflammatory; it's effects are long lasting; treatment can be adjusted to the location of the disease (this applies only to the injectable form); it is nontoxic and causes no adverse side effects; it generally doesn't cause allergic reactions; and it doesn't interact with other drugs to cause side effects.
In addition to it's effectiveness in the treatment of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and other autoimmune disorders, SOD appears to be beneficial in treating other age related disorders.
Recent research indicates that when tissue undergoes a period of lack of oxygen (hypoxia), followed by the reestablishment of the oxygen supply, free radicals form in the blood vessel wall's inner lining. These free radicals cause extensive damage to the vessel wall, opening holes through which water, calcium and other substances penetrate the tissues. This accumulation of fluid and calcium causes further damage and is what injures and/or kills the tissues when they temporarily lose their oxygen supply.
Currently, surgeons are considering using SOD during the postoperative phase of open-heart-surgery, since experimental work has demonstrated that this enzyme protects the tissues from surgical trauma. In addition, transplant surgeons are beginning to administer SOD in order to keep organs alive for long periods of time once they're taken out of the body.
The inner linings of blood vessels manufacture SOD, which helps prevent the white blood cells known as PMNs (polymorphs) and monocyte from sticking to the blood vessel wall. When body tissue is without oxygen for extended periods of time, the amount of SOD present in blood vessel linings may have so many free radicals generated that the enzymes are not able to remove them at all. This short supply of SOD causes damage or death of the tissue from the excessive amounts of free radicals. Some people naturally maintain higher levels of SOD than others. The level of SOD and other antioxidants in our blood vessels is controlled, in part, by our genes. How our genetic mechanisms function in the production these antioxidant enzymes may partly explain why some of us live long, healthy lives while others die prematurely.
In addition to the health of our blood vessels, the overall health of our tissues may depend on the amount of antioxidants in them. In recent studies, high levels of SOD in relation to metabolic rates were shown to correlate directly to longevity. These results suggest that the SOD-to-superoxide-anion ratio in our tissues relates to how long we live (the more SOD and fewer free radicals your tissues produce, the longer you will live).
SOD may play a role in treating Alzheimer's disease and senile dementia. Recent studies indicate that the areas in the brain affected by the diseases are the same areas that suffer free-radical damage from hypoxia-reperfusion injury. The identification and treatment of people at risk for hypoxia-reperfusion injury is difficult because those who are affected tell themselves that becoming forgetful is "normal", when in fact it should never be considered normal. I have used chelating therapy, along with SOD and other antioxidants, in many cases of early dementia and have seen excellent results. A paper describing my treatment methods is available by sending a stamped, self-addressed, large envelope to "Dementia" at the address at the end of this article.
Alcohol has been shown to produce the superoxide anion, and alcohol produces the scarring of the liver leading to the condition known as cirrhosis of the liver. SOD should be taken by anyone who drinks to help development of scar tissue. The same holds for those of us with high cholesterol and a family history of heart disease. We need to do everything we can to prevent the development of atherosclerosis.
In the last year, health food companies have developed whole-food antioxidant enzyme complexes containing high quantities of SOD, aling with catalase and glutathione reductase. The new products are unique in that they are vegetable concentrates in in an enteric coating, which keeps them from being destroyed by the stomach's acid. In the past, SOD was available in the form of pills containing very little SOD. The new pills each contain more than 1.5 million units. Consult your nutritionally oriented physician to determine the proper dosage for you.


Dr Steenblock, a member of our Medical Advisory Board, is president of the Anti-Aging Research Institute of America, 222821 Lake Forest Dr., Suite 114, El Toro, CA 92630, 714-770-9616. He practices general, preventative and restorative medicine, and has written a number of articles and books that may be obtained by writing to the above address.

ARTHRITIS HELP

Fighting Free Radicals

by Michael Lemmon, DVM

What are free radicals? They sound dangerous - and they are. You may have read about them recently in connection with the aging process and with degenerative diseases. How are they formed? What kind of damage do they do? Most importantly, how does the body protect itself against them?

Arthritis

One of the contributing causes of arthritis is the excess accumulation of free radicals in the joint capsule - the fluid-filled sac surrounding every joint in the body.

This fluid, or "joint oil" is kept healthy with the help of enzymes produced by the body. The enzymes act like soap - they clean away the free radicals - keeping the joint properly lubricated and allowing free movement. Otherwise, the free radicals would slowly eat away the lining of the joint capsule, causing pain and swelling.

Those with arthritic animals know the stiff, painful legacy of the disease, as joints get seemingly "frozen" into position.

What can be done about this? First, it helps to know where the free radicals come from.

Free radicals are formed during normal cellular metabolism, when cells take in nutrients, assimilate and utilize the nutrients, and then excrete the waste products.

Some of these waste products are free radicals. Wherever you find poor quality foods being eaten, you will also find an excess of free radicals.

Food Link

Rancid fats and moldy grains are two leading sources of free radical production in both animals and humans. Where do they come from?

Fat is an essential ingredient in any diet. Rancidity is caused by oxidation of fats during processing or storage of foods. Mold often occurs from storage conditions. Often chemicals which are sprayed or added to foods to help control other problems increase free radical production in foods. Chemicals and pollutants in our air, water, and food supply also significantly increase free radical production in the body.

Free radicals, if they are not neutralized by antioxidants, will cause damage to the body's tissue systems.

There is, however, protection. Many cases of arthritis will respond effectively and quickly to a selected diet of fresh foods avoiding rancid fats, moldy grains and chemicals that are present in processed, commercial foods. Since most owners must rely on the convenience of commercial foods, it becomes doubly important to supplement their animal's diets with antioxidants.

SOD and Catalase

A highly effective antioxidant is the enzyme combination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT).

These two enzymes are produced in the cells of both animals and humans. We are each born with an enzyme "bank". Babies have twice as much SOD - catalase as adults. These SOD - catalase enzymes are the most free radical destroyers. They also help remove other poisons and toxins.

The body's ability to to produce SOD - catalase decreases with age. There is good evidence that over time, the excessive use of the body's enzyme systems also decreases this enzyme production. Sparing the body's enzyme "bank", or reserve, by consuming raw foods that are rich in enzymes helps solve this free radical problem.

Another solution is to take SOD - catalase enzyme supplements. The most effective are derived from specially grown wheat sprouts. The wheat sprout tablet form of SOD - catalase is the most beneficial source of antioxidant protection because they are whole foods and contain both ' live' enzymes and all the nutritional co-factors to complete utilization.

These supplements have proven to be very helpful for arthritis and other geriatric degenerative in my practice as well as in the practice of other veterinarians throughout the country. SOD - catalase supplements are harmless and do not have any negative side-effects.

The amount given depends on the size of the animal and also on the severity of the condition. Sometimes amounts of six or more tablets are given daily to more reduce the buildup of free radicals and other toxins in the body. This reduces the pain and inflammation of the condition, allowing the veterinarian to prescribe lower doses as needed. Relief of free radical toxins also promoted vitality and speeds healing when an animal is injured or undergoes surgery.

Rather than treating arthritis and other degenerative problems in animals with heavy doses of steroids and other drugs - which have harmful side effects - we can instead rely on the use of simple, effective whole food antioxidants that work in harmony with the body assisting in it's daily routine, helping to alleviate pain, discomfort, and disease.

About The Author

Michael Lemmon, DVM is a holistic veterinarian based in Renton, WA. At his Highlands Veterinary he practices both complimentary (holistic) medicine and conventional (allopathic) medicine. He has appeared on local TV and radio shows. He serves on the boards of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association, and Resort of the Mountains, a rustic retreat center specializing in health care, cleansing and rejuvenation.


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AMINO ACIDS, ANTIOXIDANTS AND ENZYMES

AMINO ACIDS

THE FUNCTION OF AMINO ACIDS

Amino acids are the chemical units or the "building blocks ' as they are popularly called, that make up proteins. Protein could not exist without the proper combination of amino acids. To understand how vital amino acids are, you must understand how essential proteins are to life. It is protein that provides the structure for all living things. Each organism from the largest animal to the tiniest microbe is composed of protein. And in its various forms, it is protein that participates in the vital chemical processes that enable us to sustain life.

In the human body, protein substances make up the muscles, ligaments, tendons, organs, glands, nails, hair, and body fluids (except for bile and urine). Proteins are essential for the growth of bones. Enzymes, hormones, and genes are also comprised of various proteins. Next to water, protein makes up the greatest portion of our body weight. Consequently, it is easy to see why meeting our body's protein requirements is so important to good health.

In order for a protein to be complete, it must contain all of its particular amino acids. Amino acids may be linked together almost indefinitely to form more than 50,000 different proteins and 20,000 known enzymes. Because each type of protein is composed of different amino acids, each being tailored for a specific need, they are not interchangeable. Amino acids contain about 16 percent nitrogen. This distinguishes them from carbohydrates and fats in the body.

The central nervous system cannot function without amino acids, which act as neurotransmitters or as precursors to the neurotransmitters. They are necessary in order for the brain to receive and send messages. Unless all of the amino acids are present together, almost anything can go wrong with the transmission of the message. A meal high in protein will temporarily increase alertness.

There are approximately twenty-nine commonly known amino acids that account for the hundreds of different types of proteins present in all living things. In the human body, the liver produces about 80 percent of the amino acids we need. The remaining 20 percent must be obtained from outside sources. The amino acids that must be obtained from the diet are called essential amino acids. The essential amino acids that enter the body through diet are arginine, Histidine, Isoleucine, Leucine, Lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, Threonine, Tryptophan, and Valine. Other amino acids that the body seems to be able to manufacture from other sources are ala nine, arginine, aspartic acid, asparagine, glutamic acid, glut amine, glycine, praline, and serine.

Most of the amino acids (excluding glycine) can appear in two forms, one being the mirror image of the other. These are called the D- and L-series. Because amino acids in the L-series are in the same natural form as amino acids found in living plant or animal tissue, they are considered to be more compatible to human biochemistry. The ones that make up a protein are all of the L-configuration, except phenylalanine, which can also appear as DL-phenylalanine.

The process of assembling amino acids to make proteins or breaking down proteins into individual amino acids for the body's use is continuous. When we need more enzyme proteins, the body produces more enzyme proteins; when we need more cells, the body produces more proteins for cells. These different types of proteins are produced as the need arises. Should the body deplete itself of its reserves of any of the essential amino acids, it would not be able to produce those proteins requiring such amino acids. The resulting protein shortage could easily lead to any number of disorders.

How could such a deficiency occur? Easier than you might think. If the diet is improperly balanced, that is, contains inadequate amounts of the essential amino acids, physical disorders will arise. Other symptoms will appear if an individual suffers from a protein deficiency stemming from his inability to digest food properly. In order to avoid such problems, we can make sure we eat a properly balanced diet, or we can take supplements containing essential amino acids.

In addition to their other vital functions, amino acids enable vitamins and minerals to perform their jobs properly. Even if the vitamins and minerals are absorbed and assimilated rapidly, they will not be effective unless amino acids are present.

WHAT'S ON THE SHELVES

Amino acids are available in combination with various multivitamin formulas, as protein mixtures, in a wide variety of food supplements, and in a number of amino acid formulas. They can be purchased as capsules, tablets, and powders. Most amino acid supplements are derived from egg protein, yeast protein, or animal protein. The crystalline free form amino acids are generally extracted from a variety of grain products. Brown rice bran is a prime source, although cold-pressed yeast and milk proteins are also used. Amino acids in the free form are the purest. Free form amino acids can be taken for rapid absorption. These white crystalline amino acids are stable at room temperature and decompose when heated to temperatures between 350 F and 660 F (180 C and 350 C).

ANTIOXIDANTS

There is a group of vitamins, minerals, and enzymes called antioxidants that help protect our body from the formation of free radicals. Free radicals are atoms or groups of atoms that can cause damage to our cells, impairing our immune system and leading to infections and various degenerative diseases. There are three known free radicals--the super oxide, the hydroxyl, and peroxide. They may be formed by exposure to radiation and toxic chemicals, overexposure to the sun's rays, or through the action of various metabolic processes, such as the use of stored fat molecules for energy. The way in which free radicals are normally kept in check is by the action of free radical scavengers that occur naturally in the body. These scavengers neutralize the free radicals. Certain enzymes serve this vital function. Four important enzymes that neutralize free radicals naturally are super oxide dismutase (SOD), methione reductase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. I he body makes these as a matter of course. In addition, the work of these scavenger enzymes can be supplemented by a diet rich in antioxidants such as vitamins A, E, and C, the mineral selenium, and other nutrients. These antioxidants are also scavengers, gobbling up the free radical particles.

THE ANTIOXIDANTS

If the diet is inadequate or lacing the appropriate antioxidants, or if the system is overwhelmed by free radicals, you can take the following supplements to aid the body in destroying free radicals.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is necessary for healthy mucous cells and promotes germ-killing enzymes. Beta-carotene and vitamin A destroy carcinogens (cancer-producing substances) .

Vitamin C

In addition to increasing interferon production, vitamin C is a potent stimulator of T-effector cell activity and is also a very powerful antioxidant. Vitamin C reduces lipid production in the brain and spinal cord, which frequently incur free radical damage. These sites can be protected by significant amounts of vitamin C, which is needed to cross the blood-brain barrier. Vitamin C acts as a more potent free radical scavenger in the presence of a bioflavonoid called hesperidin.

Vitamin E

Vitamin E is a powerful antioxidant that prevents fat and cell membrane rancidity and protects the coating around each cell. Vitamin E improves oxygen utilization and enhances immune response. New evidence suggests that zinc is needed to maintain normal blood concentrations of vitamin E.

Gamma-Linoleic Acid (GLA)

GLA is a key regulator of T-lymphocyte function in the body. GLA can be made from linoleic acid, which i found in vegetable oils, but if zinc, magnesium, an vitamins C, Be (pyridoxine), B, (niacin), and A are deft cient, the conversion may be blocked. Hydrogenate vegetable oils, margarine, or a high-fat diet can als inhibit this important conversion to GLA. Evenin primrose oil, black currant seed oil, and borage oil ar the main sources of preformed GLA.

L-Cysteine

This sulphur-containing amino acid is needed to produces glutathione. It is used by the liver and the lymphocytes to detoxify chemicals and germ poisons. Cystein Is a powerful detoxifier of alcohol, tobacco smoke, ant environmental pollutants, all of which are immune suppressors.

L-Glutathione

This powerful antioxidant rids the body of free radicals, protecting it from the harmful effects of metals, drugs, cigarette smoke, and alcohol.

Selenium

A partner/synergist with vitamin E, selenium is essential for the key enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (each enzyme molecule contains four selenium atoms). It stimulates increased antibody response to germ infection.

Superoxide Dismuhse (SOD)

SOD is an enzyme. A health body produces nearly 5 million units of SOD and its partner catalase daily. SOD revitalizes the cells and reduces the rate of cell destruction. It removes the most common free radical, super oxide. SOD also aids in the body's utilization of zinc, copper, and manganese. free radical production increases with aging, while SOD levels are reduced. The potential of SOD to slow the aging process is currently being explored. The SOD supplement in pill form mus* be enteric coated, that is, coated with a protective substance that allows the SOD pill to pass intact through the stomach acid into the small intestines to be absorbed. A supplement should be able to provide a daily amount of about 5 million units or higher. SOD naturally occurs in barley grass, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, wheat grass, and most green plants.

AOX/PLX by Agrigenic Food Corporation Food Corporation

This product contains large amounts of antioxidants to aid the body in destroying free radicals.


ENZYMES

WHAT ARE ENZYMES?

Found in all living plant and animal matter, enzymes are essential for maintaining proper function of the body, digesting food, and aiding in the repair of tissue. Made up of protein, the thousands of known enzymes play a role in virtually all body activities. In fact, life could not be sustained without enzymes, despite the presence of sufficient amounts of vitamins, minerals, water, and proteins. Scientists are unable to manufacture enzymes synthetically.
Each enzyme has a specific function in the body that no other enzyme can fulfill. The shape of a particular enzyme is so specialized that it will initiate a reaction in only certain substances. The substance that is altered in the presence of the enzyme is called the substrate. The enzyme grasps, holds, and binds the substrate with other molecules, increasing its rate of reaction with these substances. Most reactions in cells are catalyzed (initiated) by these essential proteins, whose mineral component allows the reaction to take place. Because enzymes are needed for numerous body functions, it is important that they not be overloaded. For example, if the body must produce sufficient amounts of enzymes or digestive function, then production of enzymes for proper metabolic function may be lacking.
While the body manufactures a supply of enzymes, it can also obtain enzymes from food. Unfortunately, enzymes are extremely sensitive to heat. Low degrees of heat will destroy enzymes in food, so in order to obtain enzymes from the diet, the food must be eaten raw. Cooked foods will be depleted of all enzymes. Those who do not eat raw foods or supplement their diets with enzymes put undue strain on the supply of enzymes in their bodies. Because enzymes are the only nutrients that can supply the body with energy needed for its activities, overuse can impair the functioning capacity of the body, making it susceptible to cancer, obesity, cardiovascular disease, and a host of other illnesses.
To ease the burden of the enzymes manufactured in the body, it is helpful to eat raw foods. Not only will they supply enzymes for use by the body, but they will also inhibit the release of enzymes by the body that occurs with the consumption of cooked foods. This enables the body's supply of enzymes to work at a higher capacity when needed. Avocados, bananas, and mangos an rich in enzymes, but sprouts are its highest source. I cooked and raw foods are eaten at the same meal, take one to three enzyme supplements during the meal-- not afterward. Enzyme capsules can be opened and sprinkled on the food.

THE FUNCTION OF ENZYMES

Enzymes assist in practically all body functions. In hydrolysis, digestive enzymes break down food particles for storage in the leer or muscles. This stored energy is later converted by other enzymes for use by the body when necessary. Enzymes also utilize food ingested by the body to construct new muscle tissue, nerve cells, bone, skin, or glandular tissue. For example, one enzyme can take dietary phosphorus and convert it to bone.
These important nutrients also aid in elimination of toxins by the colon, honeys, lungs, and skin. One enzyme, for instance, initiates the formation of urea, which is excreted in the urine, while another enables the elimination of carbon dioxide from the lungs.
In addition to its other functions, enzymes decompose poisonous hydrogen peroxide and liberate healthful oxygen from it. Iron is concentrated in the blood due to the action of enzymes, which also help the blood to coagulate in order to stop bleeding. These vital proteins promote oxidation, a process in which oxygen is united with other substances. Energy is created in the oxidation process. They also protect the blood from dangerous waste materials by converting these substances to forms that are easily eliminated by the body.

Commercially Available Enzymes

A healthy body produces nearly 5 million units of the enzymes super oxide dismutase (SOD) and its partner, catalase, daily SOD revitalizes the cells and reduces the rate of cell destruction. It removes the most common free radical, super oxide. This antioxidant also aids in the body's utilization of zinc, copper, and manganese. With aging, free radical production increases, while SOD levels are reduced.

If the SOD supplement is in pill arm, it must be enteric coated--that is, coated with a protective substance that allows the SOD pill to pass intact through the stomach acid into the small intestines to be absorbed. A supplement should be able to provide a daily amount of about 5 million units or higher. SOD naturally occurs in the following food sources: barley grass, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, wheat grass, and most green plants.

Plant enzymes differ substantially from animal enzymes. Pancreatic, derived from secretions of an animal pancreas, functions best in the alkaline media of the small intestine. This enzyme is important in cancer research.
Unripe papaya, pineapples, and the aspergillus plant are excellent sources of enzymes. The enzymes extracted from papaya and pineapple, pepsin and bromelain respectively, are proteolytic enzymes. These work on proteins exclusively, breaking them down into smaller pep tones by hydrolysis. Other examples of proteolytic enzymes include pepsin, trypsin, rennin, pancreatic, and chymotrypsin. The enzyme pepsin is found in the gastric juice, and is responsible for the breakdown of protein into smaller peptizes.
Beneficial results have been obtained by utilizing proteolytic enzymes as anti-inflammatory agents. These enzymes are used for sports injuries, diseases of the respiratory tract, laryngitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, emphysema, viral diseases, cancer, and most types of degenerative diseases. Proteolytic enzymes are available through Nature's Plus and Miller Pharmacal Group.
Aspergillus plants have different strains that allow protease, amylase, and lipase to be extracted from them, assuring proper digestion. The enzyme supplement you choose should contain all the enzyme groups to ensure maximum benefit for digestion of any cooked food.

 

 

BECAUSE THE BODY NEEDS MORE THAN PROCESSED FOODS!

The information contained on this website has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Information found on this website should not be used to diagnose, cure, prevent or mitigate disease.  This website is provided for educational purposes only. Statements contained herein are presented in an effort to share information about free radical biology, and advances in nutrition only. Content may change frequently and may be incomplete; consequently, information presented herein may not be accurate until finalized. Dietary supplement research and information expressed herein should be considered anecdotal in nature or opinions and hypotheses rather than generally accepted science. Unless otherwise noted, the studies presented herein may not have adhered to the strict regulatory controls required for approval of applied nutritional claims. Except where otherwise noted, some unpublished studies referenced herein have not been subjected to peer review in independent scientific journals. None of the information published herein may be used to suggest that any dietary supplement is a generally accepted treatment, preventative, cure or mitigation for any disease, except where approved as a permissible health claim pursuant to current regulation. See the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition Website for more information about approved health claims for dietary supplements.

COPYRIGHT 2005, NO PORTION OF THIS MATERIAL MAY BE REPLICATED IN ANY WAY,
 UNLESS WRITTEN CONSENT HAS BEEN GRANTED BY AGRIGENIC FOOD COMPANY.

See our legal information and privacy statement.
If you find any problems with this site please email :
webmaster@agrigenic.com

All products are trademarks of Agrigenic Food Company

 

BECAUSE THE BODY NEEDS MORE THAN PROCESSED FOODS!

The information contained on this website has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Information found on this website should not be used to diagnose, cure, prevent or mitigate disease.  This website is provided for educational purposes only. Statements contained herein are presented in an effort to share information about free radical biology, and advances in nutrition only. Content may change frequently and may be incomplete; consequently, information presented herein may not be accurate until finalized. Dietary supplement research and information expressed herein should be considered anecdotal in nature or opinions and hypotheses rather than generally accepted science. Unless otherwise noted, the studies presented herein may not have adhered to the strict regulatory controls required for approval of applied nutritional claims. Except where otherwise noted, some unpublished studies referenced herein have not been subjected to peer review in independent scientific journals. None of the information published herein may be used to suggest that any dietary supplement is a generally accepted treatment, preventative, cure or mitigation for any disease, except where approved as a permissible health claim pursuant to current regulation. See the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition Website for more information about approved health claims for dietary supplements.

COPYRIGHT 2005, NO PORTION OF THIS MATERIAL MAY BE REPLICATED IN ANY WAY,
 UNLESS WRITTEN CONSENT HAS BEEN GRANTED BY AGRIGENIC FOOD COMPANY.

See our legal information and privacy statement.
If you find any problems with this site please email :
webmaster@agrigenic.com

All products are trademarks of Agrigenic Food Company